TUNDRANAUTICA

Bringing Home the Freshest Kill

Posts in the Batman category

Sample oscillator from hexagonal Game of Life.

  • Conway’s Game of Life, “also known simply as Life, is a cellular automaton devised by the British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970. The ‘game’ is a zero-player game, meaning that its evolution is determined by its initial state, requiring no further input. One interacts with the Game of Life by creating an initial configuration and observing how it evolves.”
  • Daniel Kalder on Joseph Brodsky’s Guide to Basic Conversation: “The qualities that make for an interesting conversationalist – wit, originality, experience, verbal dexterity, storytelling ability — cannot be extracted from familiarity with a mountain of books.”
  • Moon Knight is back:  “Moon Knight may not yet be a marquee Marvel character, but he’s acclaimed writer Warren Ellis’ kind of weird. A mercenary brought back to life by an ancient Egyptian god, the moneyed, gadget-equipped vigilante alter ego of Marc Spector fights crime at night dressed in white. Moon Knight has been criticized as a less compelling Batman, but Ellis, the British writer who will pen an upcoming comic book series featuring the character, mischievously twists the comparison.”

Moon Knight #1 Art by Bill Sienkiewicz.

  • Old Skull: “The band…came out of Wisconsin, formed by the Toulon brothers, Jamie and J.P. and their friend Jesse Collins-Davies. The Toulon brothers were nine and ten years old respectively and Jesse was ten. The brother’s father, Vern Toulon, was friends with Robin Davies, a member of respected Wisconsin band Tar Babies and Davies suggested his stepson form a band with the Toulon brothers. Once the deal was sealed, Old Skull came together about 1987. Quickly developing a reputation for their age and the subject matter of the songs, they managed to snag a deal with Restless Records and entered the studio with future Garbage member and producer Steve Marker and their fathers, the trio cranked out a noisy album of pre-adolescent hardcore entitled Get Outta School in 1989.”

Rob Ford

Ukrainian protesters in digger

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Sometimes the Pit Sends Something Back

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To wit.

BatCat

Harvey DentCat

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Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson. Panel from Batma...

Pal Ricky has the best, most accurate review of the Dark Knight Rises that I have seen so far. A sample:

Never mind why every single character in the film always happens to be in exactly the right spot at the right time. Never mind that nobody could figure out that Bruce Wayne was Batman despite the fact that his armory was discovered inside Wayne Enterprises. Never mind that nobody apparently did anything to examine the background of Miranda Tate. Never mind that the police just lounged around doing nothing underground for three months. Never mind that everyone in the entire world outside of Gotham City just went on about their lives, occasionally asking each other, “Hey, you know whatever happened to that nuclear bomb in Gotham City? Yeah, I haven’t heard, either. You gonna eat that?” Never mind that Bruce Wayne had the most miraculous recovery from a broken back in the history of comic book movies.

Whole thing here.

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Christian Bale as Batman.

From the Wall Street Journal. (Emphasis mine.)

No family retainer has ever been more faithful than Alfred, the butler played by Michael Caine in Christopher Nolan’s Batman films, or more frustrated in his efforts to protect his beloved master from harm. Not once but several times in the course of “The Dark Knight Rises,” Alfred implores the angst-ridden Bruce Wayne to move on, get a life and find happiness. His appeals are genuinely moving, inevitably unavailing and beside the point. Gotham City needs Batman. Time Warner needs Batman. The world has waited four years to find out how the Batman saga resolves. And feeling good about life is not what Christian Bale’s Batman wants. This third—and, the director insists, final—installment of Mr. Nolan’s series makes you feel thoroughly miserable about life. It’s spectacular, to be sure, but also remarkable for its all-encompassing gloom. No movie has ever administered more punishment, to its hero or its audience, in the name of mainstream entertainment.

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English: David Icke, English writer and public...

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