TUNDRANAUTICA

Bringing Home the Freshest Kill

Posts in the libertarianism category

Just Like Paradise

 

 

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  • Andrew Kirell — No, The Actual Libertarian Movement Didn’t ‘Go Nuts’ — It’s Just The One Inside Bill Maher’s Head: “[Libertarians] do have our share of thoughtful radicals, but the majority of [us] are generally pragmatic when it comes to policy. For instance, many of us believe pollution controls are necessary in situations where the market cannot effectively produce the best outcome. Either way, painting libertarians as dark-hearted souls wanting to revert mankind into some Thunderdome-like anarchic existence is just as silly as saying liberals’ ultimate goal is a barren wasteland full of Stalin-esque labor camps and thought police.”
  • J.D. TuccilleWhy I’m Teaching My Son to Break the Law: “Personally, I would say that I love liberty more than any other value, and I don’t give a damn if my neighbors or the state disagree. I will be free, and I’m willing to help others be free, if they want my assistance. Screw any laws to the contrary.”
  • Jim GoadLanguage as an Assault Weapon: “A huge quotient of the seemingly endless cultural and ideological wars hinges on how terms are defined. Those who claim authority to declare what words mean are able to shape public thinking like a sculptor molds clay. Although facts — which are what news organizations are supposed to peddle — seem immutable, words are forever in flux. Both ‘liberal’ and ‘progressive’ now mean almost the opposite of what they did a century ago.”

English: Bunker Hill in downtown Los Angeles a...

 

 

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Auntie Anne's

  • Being in a Band is For Losers (Needs one additional paragraph about the requisite intervention Aging Band Guy‘s friends must administer to save his train-wreck life.)
  • Daniel Kalder: Are White Supremacists On The Rampage In Texas? — “…white power freaks had been almost mythical creatures for me, like unicorns, only less appealing to preteen girls. Of course, I knew that they existed, but overexposure to British TV documentaries about American weirdos in the 1990s, not to mention Russian anti-Americanism in the 2000s, had bred weariness in me, and I had rejected the characterization of America as a land teeming with survivalists, apocalyptic believers, Hitler fans and serial killers long before I moved here. I mean, come on: No place could be that interesting.”
  • Gates of Hell: “A group of Italian archaeologists have announced they have found the legendary ‘Pluto’s Gate,’ a portal filled with foul-smelling noxious fumes which inflicted a quick death on any person or beast that was driven into its embrace.”
  • Gavin McInnes:Here in the real world, love is blind. So are erections. [Men] don’t really care what [women] look like as long as you have a vagina and don’t dry-heave when you see us naked. If women knew how unbelievably perverted we are, they wouldn’t even brush their hair. Napoleon said to Josephine, ‘I will return to Paris tomorrow evening. Don’t wash.’ We want to inhale your flaws. As my buddy Sharky said, ‘Smelling a woman’s ass is a poor man’s Viagra.’ Our testosterone is already airbrushing you into perfection the second you walk into the room. We have virtually no deal-breakers.”
  • Roger Ebert‘s 1971 review of Head: “It was written by Jack Nicholson, who went on to star in “Easy Rider” and “Five Easy Pieces,” and directed by Bob Rafelson, who directed “Five Easy Pieces.” The producer, Bert Schneider, created the Monkees for television with Rafelson, and “Head” was apparently their scheme to bury them.”
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Kubrick's film was the second to make notably ...

 

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  • Daniel Kalder: “…Felix Dzerzhinsky had a soul. He knew the pangs of love, the joys and sorrows of family. He advocated tolerance, openness, freedom, fairness, balance- in family life anyway. In his career as a fanatical communist and mass murderer he had no problem with imposing his viewpoints on millions, via the barrel of a gun if necessary. If only they’d invented television, and Oprah, earlier. Felix might have found another, less catastrophic, career.”
  • From the Man, Economy & Sport blog: “I wonder if the [Green Bay] Packers’ unique ownership structure might not be a working model for organizing a local government along more libertarian lines. Imagine a city where you sold shares to raise revenue for capital projects — building roads, fire stations, et al. — and limited the number of shares any one person could purchase at a time. Shareholders could vote for directors (city councilors) and for or against charter revisions (bylaws), but they could not sell the shares for profit or otherwise enjoy any special privileges. And when you needed to raise money for another capital project, you could just sell more shares. Operating expenses would then be paid through user fees — after all, Packers shareholders still have to buy tickets to actually attend games.”

Green Bay Packers uniform: 1984–1988

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 Dennis Kucinich speaking at an SEIU event.Emphases mine.
  • Daily Kos, always eager to serve and fellate the current executive office, champions the Surveillance State here.
  • Daniel Kalder: “On a recent visit to Istanbul I stayed in an apartment looking out on the Bosphorus. Every morning I’d get up and see the sun sparkling on the surface of the water as birds circled languidly overhead. At night it was even better, as the thumping techno from the pleasure boats and the call of the Muezzin intermingled. It was very different from my usual mode of accommodation when I travel: cheap hotels, dirt, and the lingering possibility of sudden, violent death.”
  • Manifest Density: “...people love to be told that they’re great just the way they are. I think this is the lens through which one should view much of Gawker Media’s output, from their shaming of racist teens on Twitter to their outing of Violentacrez the Reddit troll. The moral judgments underlying these articles aren’t wrong, which makes them very hard to argue against. But the public performance of those values is clearly about flattering the sensibilities of the audience — ‘gawker’ is exactly the right word for it. When the formula works, there’s an element of triumphalist mob mentality to the proceedings. To me, at least, this often seems more odious than the pathetic and easily-dismissed troll’s gambit.”
  • More Kalder: “Personally, I don’t doubt that Texas would be very successful if it became a country. The state has the 14th largest economy in the world: bigger than Australia’s. But the vast majority of Texans believe that they are better off inside the USA and so the secession movement is extremely weak. I know this because last year I attended a meeting of the Texas Nationalists on the 175th anniversary of Texas independence. Although they claimed to have 250,000 members they could barely scrape together 30 folk to fill a room in a hotel built on the historical grounds of the Alamo itself. They were gentle, peaceful people: every now and then a speaker would look out the window at the old mission house and cry.
  • Tom Jackson: “The votes have been counted and the results seem clear: Libertarians won. I’m not joking. Ballot initiatives measure actual popularity of social movements, and the resounding victories last victories of ballot measures to approve the legalization of marijuana and to support gay marriage amount to a stunning shift in public opinion in favor of freedom. Voters approved gay marriage in three states, Maine, Maryland and Washington, and defeated a ban on gay marriage in Minnesota. They approved legalizing the use of marijuana in two states, Washington and Colorado. It was the first time that either issue had been approved in a state ballot referendum. This seems much more significant to me than worrying about which professional politician in the Oval Office or on the Senate floor will be using your tax money to buy votes.”
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While leafing through the recent issue of Reason, I came upon this confusing advertisement and image:

A bit odd, no?

To be fair, the advertiser — “The Twelve Visions Party” — may be a virtuous troupe of happenin’ freedom mongers.

But their ad campaign has an uncanny valley thing going on. Not unlike this robot interview.

My fellow libertarians are by and large swell people, but ever since my visit to a Harry Browne rally in 2000, I’ve noticed that a few of them have the glazed-over “Scientologist Look” in their eyes.

It’s as if the mere mention of the terms “eminent domain” and “easement” send them straight into a trance.

A completely unfair characterization, to be sure, but I’m throwing it out there for discussion.

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