TUNDRANAUTICA

Bringing Home the Freshest Kill

Posts in the spying category

 Spider Woman by Alex Maleev

  • Daniel Kalder on Edward Snowden and the irony of leaking:  “…when it comes to leaks, irony abounds. The Russians and the Chinese and the Cubans relish the irony of protecting a dissident from the US, the self-proclaimed champion of human rights. Snowden hopes to escape to a country less free than the one he betrayed in the name of freedom. And let us not forget the master-leaker, Julian Assange of Wikileaks, who entered the Ecuadorean embassy in London to avoid being sent to prison, and now lives in what is, essentially, a prison. After a year of seeing his pasty face around their offices every day, I cannot imagine how much those diplomats must hate him. Those whom the gods would destroy…”
  • More Kalder — on the last words/goodbyes of death row inmates: “…it’s easier for the condemned if they have religious faith. God, Jesus, or Allah provide reassurance that life’s journey is not about to end on the executioner’s gurney, and that even the worst murderers will be forgiven in heaven as they were not forgiven by the State of Texas.”
  • Noah Rothman on the media’s transgressions in covering the Trayvon Martin trial: “Clearly, the public is more sophisticated than some members of the media believe. The way in which baseless speculation motivated by personal bias is packaged to appear to be analysis is as transparent as cellophane. It is insulting and it is detrimental to the future of the business of television journalism.”
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  • ForeignPolicy.com: “…the claim repeatedly made by President Obama and his senior aides — that targeted [drone] killings are limited only to officials, members, and affiliates of al Qaeda who pose an imminent threat of attack on the U.S. homeland — is false.”
  • Night photographer Troy Paiva: “You can’t do this kind of photography if you spook easily, because yes, these places can be creepy in daylight. At night the creep factor really spikes. But a lot of those spooky feelings are bred into us — from a very early age we’re taught to be scared of abandoned places. That they are inhabited by ghosts and demons, that no good can come of visiting them. It’s been a common literary trope for 100 generations, so long that it’s practically stamped on us genetically. I’ve never seen a ghost, and I’ve spent nights in dozens of supposedly haunted places. I’ve experienced a lot of things that people could interpret as ghosts, but were easily explained away as wind under the eaves, or animals in the walls. And even if there really were ghosts, what can they do to me?”
  • When it comes to eating locally, Oregonians are full of shit

 

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