TUNDRANAUTICA

Bringing Home the Freshest Kill

Posts in the Twitter category

One of my biggest beefs with progressives — besides the baked-in authoritarianism of their ideology — is how infrequently you see prog voices in media or social media doing any sort of critical self-analysis. Almost zero energy is spent looking inward and examining progressivism’s flaws. Instead, we get reams of groupthink and tribalism.

And if those of us outside the enlightened progressive spectrum dare critique its monolithic shit factory, we can expect to be characterized as racist/sexist monsters, or low-information voters — or whatever — and punished accordingly.

Nice then, that prog writer Freddie DeBoer provided a truly great piece of progressive criticism in a blog post last week.

He writes (bold emphases are mine):

Criticism of today’s progressives tends to use words like toxic, aggressive, sanctimonious, and hypocritical. I would not choose any of those. I would choose lazy. We are lazy as political thinkers and we are lazy as culture writers and we are lazy as movement builders. We ward off criticism of our own bad work by acting like that criticism is inherently anti-feminist or anti-progressive. We seem spoiled, which seems insane because everything is messed up and so many things are getting worse. I guess having a Democratic president just makes people feel complacent. Well, look: as a political movement we are in pathetic shape right now. We not only have no capacity to move people who don’t already share our worldview, we seem to have no interest in doing so. Our stock arguments are lazy stacks of cliches. We seem to want to confirm everything conservatives say about our inability to argue without calling other people racist. We can’t articulate why our vision of the future is better than the other side’s, and in fact many of us will tell you that it’s offensive to think that we have an obligation to educate others on that vision at all. We celebrate grassroots activist movements like Black Lives Matter, but we insult them by treating them as the same thing as hashtag campaigns, and we don’t build a broader left-wing political movement that could increase their likelihood of success. We spend all day, every day, luxuriating in how much better we are than other people, having convinced ourselves that the work of politics is always external, never internal. We have made politics synonymous with social competition. We’re a mess.

More (again, emphases mine):

If you want us to stop being a mess, you have to be willing to criticize, and you have to accept that every criticism of an ostensibly progressive argument is not some terrible political betrayal. Not everyone who complains about white people has enlightened racial attitudes. Not everyone who constantly drops “mansplaining” or “gaslighting” into conversation actually helps fight sexism. One-liners don’t build a movement. Being clever doesn’t fix the world. Scoring points on Twitter doesn’t create justice. Jokes make nothing happen. We’re speeding for a brutal backlash and inevitable political destruction, if not in 2016 then 2018 or 2020. If you want to help avoid that, I suggest you invest less effort in trying to be the most clever person on the internet and more on being the hardest working person in real life. And stop mistaking yourself for the movement.

The entire thing is worth reading. Find it here.

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I recently discovered some interesting insights about love in two unlikely places:

Hitchens’s book is the writer’s account of battling terminal cancer. In the afterword, his wife Carol Blue writes this passage about a secret she and her husband shared prior to a speaking engagement:

By the time I saw [Christopher] standing at the stage entrance of the 92nd Street Y that evening, he and I — and we alone — knew he might have cancer. We embraced in a shadow that only we saw and chose to defy. We were euphoric. He lifted me up and laughed.

We went into the theater, where he conquered yet another audience. We managed to get through a jubilant dinner in his honor and set out on a stroll back to our hotel through the perfect Manhattan night, walking more than fifty blocks. Everything was as it should be, except that it wasn’t. We were living in two worlds. The old one, which never seemed more beautiful, had not yet vanished; and the new one, about which we knew little except to fear it, had not yet arrived.

That passage is interesting because it covers two topics that are obsessive points of interest for me lately: Fear and Love. I suppose one could argue that fear and love are inextricably linked. I sometimes think they are.

In Murray’s book, the author gives marriage advice that seems intuitive, although many of us find ourselves mired in situations where such intuitiveness is out-of-reach. He writes:

…I believe that two people who love each other should be careful to avoid saying anything that will inflict hurt. Occasionally there will be an overwhelmingly compelling reason why the hurtful thing must be said. But if your prospective spouse says hurtful things heedlessly, or seems to take any pleasure whatsoever in causing hurt, break it off.

Some other, random and stray thoughts about love:

  • I think the best married couple on Twitter is the conservative writer Mark Hemingway and his wife Mollie Hemingway. Although my convictions and principles may be slightly different than theirs, they seem to be doing things right.
  • Love typically gets me into trouble, because I approach it with the same impulsive audacity with which I approach everything else in life. I love hard. So naturally, it often blows up in my face. Mega highs and mega lows, or as Frank Sinatra once put it:

…being an 18-karat manic-depressive and having lived a life of violent emotional contradictions, I have an overacute capacity for sadness as well as elation.

Pretty much, yeah. Although I’m not an 18-karat manic-depressive.

Remember this Living Colour song?

 

And then there’s Sailor and Lula, one of my favorite couples from the Silver Screen. Witness one of the most amazingly absurd scenes in cinema history:

 

Clearly, it takes getting pummeled by a gang of street toughs to trigger the realization* that love conquers all.

*(re: a DMT-style mental freakout)
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Official portrait of Secretary of Defense Rich...

  • The Koch Brothers
  • Sex
  • Ted Cruz
  • Racism
  • Misogyny
  • Rape Culture
  • Jon Stewart
  • Sexism in Comedy
  • Jezebel
  • Dick Cheney‘s Heart
  • Tea Party
  • Sexism
  • Lists
  • Hashtags
  • Obama
  • Affordable Care Act
  • Twitter
  • Too Funny
  • Sports
  • The Internet
  • Things
  • Reddit
  • George W. Bush

Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...

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Three Amigos

  • NFL quarterbacks have continued to rewrite the record books in recent years, perhaps none as spectacularly as Green Bay’s [Aaron] Rodgers and New Orleans’ [Drew] Brees. Rodgers’ career passer rating (104.9) is nearly 10 points higher than No. 2 [Steve] Young (96.8), No. 3 [Tom] Brady (96.6) and No. 4 [Peyton] Manning (95.7). Rodgers also boasts the lowest INT rate (1.7%) and best TD-INT ratio (3.7 to 1) in history.”
  • Richard Dawkins gets weird as motherfucking shit right here (wait for the payoff 5 minutes in, it’s worth it).
  • This is creepy and annoying, re: the Obamacare rollout: “‘If I’m uninsured and it’s October, I won’t be able to go anywhere without escaping a message,’ John Gilbert, who leads Enroll America’s field operations, told supporters in a Thursday night presentation. ‘I turn on my TV and there’s an ad. I go on the Internet and there’s another ad. Someone shows up at my door to talk about it. I go to church and my pastor is talking about it.'” —————- Hey! Go fuck yourself, Gilbert.
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TUBES

  • Pathological narcissist penis guy Anthony Weiner says he’s made some mistakes; watch him spew faux-humility here
  • Someone named Olivia Munn, naked

Rotating Thing

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BIG GODDAMN FUN LINKS!

English: Antarctica: orthographic projection; ...

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Barack Obama

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Professional Assassin, Barack Obama

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I’ve been taking some light criticism from friends, loved ones and Twitter because I’m voting for Gary Johnson, the libertarian candidate in this year’s presidential election.

But here’s a chart that arrived in my inbox today from the Libertarian Party that’s worth a glance. Now, take it for what it’s worth — a campaign graphic meant to condense complex ideas into easily consumed news bits. But by all means…do check it out, even if you think Johnson is a fringe candidate or a joke. Weigh Johnson’s various stances against that of your own candidate.

It’s a worthwhile thought experiment, if nothing else.

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This Robert!

Via Sean Tejaratchi’s Twitter account

 

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