TUNDRANAUTICA

Bringing Home the Freshest Kill

Posts in the Wall Street Journal category

John Bonham

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English: Portrait of Gore Vidal by Juan F. Bastos

  • Brian Doherty on Gore Vidal, who is now dead: “Vidal had a winning mistrust of elites and understood–and this is the key to why so many cannot tolerate him–that they, especially in the American security and foreign policy apparati, didn’t necessarily mean well and could and did behave evilly.”
  • Gavin McInnes: “Liberals are not idiots. They’re just like you were when you first moved out of your parents’ house. It’s like their research is cryogenically frozen right before Google was invented. However, unlike extremist Muslims and Hasidic Jews, some of the things they believe are actually correct.”
  • Michael Shermer: “…even though I am a life-long libertarian who champions freedom in all spheres of life and has previously opposed gun-control measures in principle (I do not personally enjoy hunting or recreational gun shooting), I now believe that the freedom of a few people to own WMMs (Weapons of Mass Murder) conflicts with the freedom of the rest of us to enter the public sphere without the chance of our ultimate freedom of life itself being cut short.”

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Christian Bale as Batman.

From the Wall Street Journal. (Emphasis mine.)

No family retainer has ever been more faithful than Alfred, the butler played by Michael Caine in Christopher Nolan’s Batman films, or more frustrated in his efforts to protect his beloved master from harm. Not once but several times in the course of “The Dark Knight Rises,” Alfred implores the angst-ridden Bruce Wayne to move on, get a life and find happiness. His appeals are genuinely moving, inevitably unavailing and beside the point. Gotham City needs Batman. Time Warner needs Batman. The world has waited four years to find out how the Batman saga resolves. And feeling good about life is not what Christian Bale’s Batman wants. This third—and, the director insists, final—installment of Mr. Nolan’s series makes you feel thoroughly miserable about life. It’s spectacular, to be sure, but also remarkable for its all-encompassing gloom. No movie has ever administered more punishment, to its hero or its audience, in the name of mainstream entertainment.

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